A Memoir of War – In Chinua Achebe’s eyes, things still fall apart: part2

I met Chinua Achebe for the first time when I was in high school, but I knew him through his works long before that.

For Achebe it appears that his life is only interesting within the context of the Nigerian Civil War (also known as the Nigeria-Biafra War) of 1967–70, which claimed up to three million lives, most of them from the Igbo ethnic group of which Achebe and I are both members.

This war began after the mass slaughter of Igbos in northern Nigeria inspired the flamboyant Oxford-educated Colonel Odumegwu Ojukwu to declare an independent state in the Igbo-dominated southeast, and inspired many to humanitarian action, even as it became a proxy battleground for corporate and Cold War interests.

Forty years on, it is impossible not to see the impact of that civil war. For many Igbos, the impact is still very personal.

Both of my grandmothers can only shake their heads and repeat “It was so terrible” when asked about that time in their lives.

As does Achebe in “There Was a Country”, my grandfather can recount numerous near brushes with death at the hands of often-ruthless Nigerian fighter and bomber pilots.

My mother and father speak vividly of the initial excitement following Ojukwu’s Declaration of Biafran Independence followed by fear, deprivation, and eventually an absolute weariness as the conflict dragged on.

For the children and grandchildren of Igbos who lived through the war, these stories of trauma have left an indelible impression that underlies a certain mistrust of Nigeria’s attempt at national unity.

Equally devastating is the war’s impact on our national political system.

Achebe writes that after the war, “the Igbo were not and continue not to be reintegrated into Nigeria, one of the main reasons for the country’s continued backwardness, in my estimation.”

A trip to the Igbo-dominated southeast reveals abysmal roads, bridges threatening to collapse, and a power grid that is all but entirely useless, all what many Igbos believe is a deliberate policy of neglect as punishment for the sin of secession.

The country has suffered as a result of what Achebe calls the evil of tribalism.

Achebe writes determinedly about how we as a country got here, in a fashion that is more about substance than style.

Gone is the integration of the oral storytelling that characterises his fictional works. Away with the sly and understated humor of his critical essays about colonialism and Nigerian society.

Enter the history of British nefariousness in rigging Nigeria’s post-independence elections, the incompetent and at times downright wicked first-republic politicians, the coups and counter-coups that eventually led to the mass killing of Nigeria’s widely dispersed Igbo population, the call for them to return to their villages, and finally the war of secession that Achebe calls a possible genocide.

Into it all are woven Achebe’s recollections about his personal and professional growth. For a memoir it is remarkably distant. Unlike his novels, fear of the unknown is not palpable.

We know that Achebe watches as things fall apart in Nigeria, and are largely given what he sees, not what he feels.

Writing a war is never easy, and writing the self equally difficult, so writing oneself into a war and that war into the self is a task of epic proportions.

Those like myself who are familiar with Biafran-war narratives because I have heard the stories over and over, seen the bombed-out foundations of the house my father grew up in, can therefore understand how Achebe’s loss shaped his writing and life.

Others, without the emotional shorthand, might find themselves lost in a collection of names and places whose significance is apparent but incompletely rendered.

It is through the inclusion of poems that formed much of Achebe’s literary output during the conflict that we encounter the emotionality that the book’s prose lacks.

Achebe’s own fear of an air raid, the loss of close friends in fighting, and the process of resuming life after the war are all displayed in his strategically placed poems.

They are also reminders of his incredibly diverse and prolific literary life, including stints as a schoolteacher, publisher, ambassador for the republic of Biafra, and professor.

When “There Was a Country” ends, we leave Achebe here in the role of the professorial elder statesman and national conscience for a Nigeria that he seems to believe, even after celebrating 52 hard years of Independence, is again on the brink of disintegration.

In broad strokes, Achebe is correct and perhaps — though hopefully not — this memoir might be as prophetic as his novel “A Man of the People”, which predicted a coup and appeared on January 15, 1966, the day a coup ushered in four years of unparalleled violence.

Though Achebe has not lived in Nigeria since he was paralysed from the waist down in 1990, he still understands the national mood, the fear of the radical Islamist political sect Boko Haram, and the little man’s complete frustration with a structure that rewards the country’s corrupt big men.

“I have stated elsewhere that this mindless carnage will end only with the dismantling of the present corrupt political system and banishment of the cult of mediocrity that runs it, hopefully through a peaceful, democratic process,” Achebe writes.

He is right, and if there is one line that gives us insight into the man and his work, it is this struggle against the “cult of mediocrity” that has defined his relationship with his country and the world.

“In my definition I am a protest writer, with restraint,” Achebe writes in a characteristically modest fashion.

It is without restraint but not without tact that his body of work has protested mediocrity in its various forms, from the British colonial apparatus, to the world’s ignorance of African literatures, to the corrosive mismanagement that has plagued Nigeria.

Like much of Achebe’s other work, this book about the progress of war and the presence of violence has a universal quality.

In a world where sectarian hatreds augmented by political mediocrity have fractured Syria and threaten to bring Israel and Iran to blows, “There Was a Country” is a valuable account of how the suffering caused by war is both unnecessary and formative.

It does not sing with the beauty of “Things Fall Apart”, or any of his other works, but it would be very hard for a man of 82 to outdo his revolutionary role in forcing African writing onto the world stage.

It is near sacrilege for any young African writer to find Achebe wanting, and though “There Was a Country” has one entangled in the way history, person, and prose interact, it leaves one wanting more — more of the Achebe this strange world created, and more of this strange world as Achebe sees it. – The Daily Beast

November 2012
M T W T F S S
« Oct   Dec »
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930