Clubs to miss Fifa World Cup golden jackpot

Harare – The fallout from Southern Africa’s collective failure in the region’s bid to qualify for the 2014 World Cup continues to be felt amid revelations that clubs from the region will lose potential rich pickings from a US$70 million Fifa fund.

The world football governing body will splash a small fortune to clubs whose players will be taking part at the globe’s biggest football festival in Brazil and have upped the stakes in the pot from the US$40 million paid out after the 2010 World Cup in South Africa to US$70 million next year.

The money is meant to be Fifa’s token of appreciation to the clubs for the investment they pour into developing the footballers, virtually on a daily basis and produce players good enough to grace the lofty heights of a World Cup finals showcase.

Clubs will be paid, depending on the number of their players who will be in the 23-man squads that will be selected to be at the World cup in Brazil and the payment is irrespective of whether or not the players really feature in the games that will be played.

What this means is that even those clubs whose players might spend the entire World Cup on the bench will still be eligible to receive payment from Fifa’s golden jackpot.

Clubs could get as much as US$200 000 each; depending on the number of players they have at the World Cup finals, and for the majority of clubs in this part of the region, most of whom survive on gate receipts could have embraced that as a huge windfall.

Fifa sent a circular to all its affiliates asking clubs to fill forms that will provide the basis for the disbursement of the funds from the US$70 million 2014 World Cup golden pot.

“All members of Fifa accept that competitions between representative teams of member associations are of vital importance to football in general and to the game’s development and standing in particular,” read the circular.

“As world football’s governing body, Fifa has a duty to promote such international matches between representative teams by taking any measures it deems appropriate.

“Bearing this in mind, the Fifa executive committee has decided to allocate an amount from the benefits of the 2014 Fifa World Cup Brazil to member associations for them to pass on to the clubs from their associations who would have helped to contributed to the successful staging of these competitions as was done with the benefits of the 2010 Fifa World Cup in South Africa.

“For the 2010 Fifa World Cup in South Africa, this amount was set at US$40 million, whereas for the upcoming 2014 Fifa World Cup Brazil, the Fifa executive committee has designated US$70 million.

“Member associations are herewith requested to immediately forward copies of the club application form to all of their affiliated top division clubs, regardless of whether or not they have released, or will release, players for a representative team at the World Cup.”

For Africans nations, only clubs from 10 nations are still in the running for the golden Fifa jackpot although only five countries will qualify for the Brazil jamboree.

Cote d’Ivoire will take Senegal, Ethiopia will battle Nigeria, Tunisia clash against Cameroon, Ghana face Egypt and Algeria have a date against Burkina Faso for a place at the 2014 Fifa World Cup.

Most of the players who play for Ethiopia are drawn from their domestic league, which gives their clubs a chance to have a bite on the Fifa golden jackpot should they beat the Super Eagles to qualify, Steve Keshi has introduced a number of home-based players in the Nigerian team and Tunisia and Algeria have a considerable number of home-based.

Zimbabwean sports consultant, Shepherd Chiware, said while South African clubs are well funded, a US$200 000 injection is a big windfall for most clubs in other parts of Southern Africa.

“The winner of the Cosafa Cup, which is the biggest football tournament in Southern Africa, received R500 000, which is equivalent to US$50 000 today, and that should tell us that US$200 000 will be a huge return for most of our clubs here,” said Chiware.

“But you can’t blame anyone because the rules are clear that you have to qualify to enjoy the benefits and we failed to do it, even though we had some good chances going into the final round of qualifiers with a number of countries with an opportunity.

“However, I don’t think we should be looking at this in terms of the dollars that could have come into the pockets of the clubs because I feel the World Cup is far bigger than that.

“The grand opportunity we have lost, as a region, is to fly our national flags at that tournament, have our players play the game at the highest level possible, make them win some new fans out there, you know, you can’t out all that into money, it’s what is called priceless.”

Pressure, too, has mounted in South Africa and in Zambia after the World Cup failed bids, Zimbabwe and Mozambique have already fired their coaches while the Malawian coach has already quit after saying that his mandate was just to try to take the Flames to the World Cup.

Bafana Bafana coach, Gordon Igesund, has come under increasing pressure and will be asked to submit a report on why he failed to meet his targets – taking the team to the semi-finals of the 2013 Nations Cup on home soil and qualifying for the 2014 World cup – when the new Safa leadership takes office at the end of this month.

Zambia coach, Herve Renard, appears on his way out – just a year after guiding Chipolopolo to Nations Cup success – with sources saying he could be joining South African powerhouse, Orlando Pirates, as a replacement for Roger de Sa.

If De Sa fails in the Champions League, say the sources, he will be shown the exit door with the Frenchman being hired although his huge salary of around US$70 000 a month could be a huge barrier.

 

 

 

Harare – 

The fallout from Southern Africa’s collective failure in the region’s bid to qualify for the 2014 World Cup continues to be felt amid revelations that clubs from the region will lose potential rich pickings from a US$70 million Fifa fund.

The world football governing body will splash a small fortune to clubs whose players will be taking part at the globe’s biggest football festival in Brazil and have upped the stakes in the pot from the US$40 million paid out after the 2010 World Cup in South Africa to US$70 million next year.

The money is meant to be Fifa’s token of appreciation to the clubs for the investment they pour into developing the footballers, virtually on a daily basis and produce players good enough to grace the lofty heights of a World Cup finals showcase.

Clubs will be paid, depending on the number of their players who will be in the 23-man squads that will be selected to be at the World cup in Brazil and the payment is irrespective of whether or not the players really feature in the games that will be played.

What this means is that even those clubs whose players might spend the entire World Cup on the bench will still be eligible to receive payment from Fifa’s golden jackpot.

Clubs could get as much as US$200 000 each; depending on the number of players they have at the World Cup finals, and for the majority of clubs in this part of the region, most of whom survive on gate receipts could have embraced that as a huge windfall.

Fifa sent a circular to all its affiliates asking clubs to fill forms that will provide the basis for the disbursement of the funds from the US$70 million 2014 World Cup golden pot.

“All members of Fifa accept that competitions between representative teams of member associations are of vital importance to football in general and to the game’s development and standing in particular,” read the circular.

“As world football’s governing body, Fifa has a duty to promote such international matches between representative teams by taking any measures it deems appropriate.

“Bearing this in mind, the Fifa executive committee has decided to allocate an amount from the benefits of the 2014 Fifa World Cup Brazil to member associations for them to pass on to the clubs from their associations who would have helped to contributed to the successful staging of these competitions as was done with the benefits of the 2010 Fifa World Cup in South Africa.

“For the 2010 Fifa World Cup in South Africa, this amount was set at US$40 million, whereas for the upcoming 2014 Fifa World Cup Brazil, the Fifa executive committee has designated US$70 million. “Member associations are herewith requested to immediately forward copies of the club application form to all of their affiliated top division clubs, regardless of whether or not they have released, or will release, players for a representative team at the World Cup.”

For Africans nations, only clubs from 10 nations are still in the running for the golden Fifa jackpot although only five countries will qualify for the Brazil jamboree.

Cote d’Ivoire will take Senegal, Ethiopia will battle Nigeria, Tunisia clash against Cameroon, Ghana face Egypt and Algeria have a date against Burkina Faso for a place at the 2014 Fifa World Cup.

Most of the players who play for Ethiopia are drawn from their domestic league, which gives their clubs a chance to have a bite on the Fifa golden jackpot should they beat the Super Eagles to qualify, Steve Keshi has introduced a number of home-based players in the Nigerian team and Tunisia and Algeria have a considerable number of home-based.

Zimbabwean sports consultant, Shepherd Chiware, said while South African clubs are well funded, a US$200 000 injection is a big windfall for most clubs in other parts of Southern Africa.

“The winner of the Cosafa Cup, which is the biggest football tournament in Southern Africa, received R500 000, which is equivalent to US$50 000 today, and that should tell us that US$200 000 will be a huge return for most of our clubs here,” said Chiware.

“But you can’t blame anyone because the rules are clear that you have to qualify to enjoy the benefits and we failed to do it, even though we had some good chances going into the final round of qualifiers with a number of countries with an opportunity.

“However, I don’t think we should be looking at this in terms of the dollars that could have come into the pockets of the clubs because I feel the World Cup is far bigger than that.

“The grand opportunity we have lost, as a region, is to fly our national flags at that tournament, have our players play the game at the highest level possible, make them win some new fans out there, you know, you can’t out all that into money, it’s what is called priceless.”

Pressure, too, has mounted in South Africa and in Zambia after the World Cup failed bids, Zimbabwe and Mozambique have already fired their coaches while the Malawian coach has already quit after saying that his mandate was just to try to take the Flames to the World Cup.

Bafana Bafana coach, Gordon Igesund, has come under increasing pressure and will be asked to submit a report on why he failed to meet his targets – taking the team to the semi-finals of the 2013 Nations Cup on home soil and qualifying for the 2014 World cup – when the new Safa leadership takes office at the end of this month.

Zambia coach, Herve Renard, appears on his way out – just a year after guiding Chipolopolo to Nations Cup success – with sources saying he could be joining South African powerhouse, Orlando Pirates, as a replacement for Roger de Sa.

If De Sa fails in the Champions League, say the sources, he will be shown the exit door with the Frenchman being hired although his huge salary of around US$70 000 a month could be a huge barrier.

September 2013
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