Haseb’s loud mouth comes back to haunt him

 

Windhoek

In what can be correctly interpreted as a deliberate exercise of paying someone back in his own coin – the Namibian Sports Commission (NSC) has grounded its vocal acting chief administrator Walter Haseb.

The NSC issued a press release yesterday informing the nation that Haseb will no longer act as the NSC chief administrator, as he has been summoned to revert to his old portfolio of head of finance and administration.

Haseb’s grounding is not surprising after the long-serving sports administrator launched a tirade of scathing attacks on the newly appointed board requesting the immediate removal of all board members.

He publicly accused the board of an assortment of wrongdoings including interference in the day-to-day running of the directorate, maladministration, and running down the financial coffers of the NSC by scheduling unnecessary meetings.

This did not go exactly well down the throats of his bosses who summarily stripped the bulky officer of his temporary plum position with immediate effect.

Uncharacteristically, the board resolved to install one of its members Peter Wilson as the acting chief administrator – very much against the spirit of sound corporate governance and transparency.

Haseb has been in charge since the mysterious departure of Harald Fulle last November.
Fulle, accredited for having turned the commission’s shoddy administration for the better, was drafted in to replace inaugural chief administrator and former Brave Warriors mentor Rusten Zukhile Mogane.

The latter left the NSC under a dark cloud in the aftermath of his mysterious indefinite suspension after charges were dropped.

New Era Sport sought advice from experts with intimate knowledge of labour law and those contacted were in harmony that appointing a board member in an acting chief administrator position constitutes a serious conflict of interest.

“Ordinarily speaking, that should not happen unless there are extreme circumstances such as if there were no competent staff members in management to assume such a position,” charged a legal guru who requested his identity be withheld for professional reasons.

Others opine that under no circumstances should board members appoint themselves into positions of technocrats within organizations they are meant to oversee.

“This is quite a weird scenario, whom and where is he or she going to report to. You can’t be a judge and the prosecutor at the same time, simple as that.”

Read full story on New Era Newspaper Namibia

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