Airbus wants to assist Namibia in patrolling illegal fishing

WINDHOEK – Aerospace Company, Airbus has shown interest in assisting Namibia with curbing illegal fishing off its coast.

Airbus Vice President for Africa, Vincent Larnicol, told President Hage Geingob at a meeting on March 31, that the French group of companies is in the process of structuring a public enterprise that will make revenue out of seizing illegal fishing ships.

He explained the company could expand Namibia’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and secure revenue without sacrificing the national budget.

“By seizing ships, imposing taxes and imposing particular licences on fishing boats, the company will generate revenue and with the revenue it will be able to purchase new equipment,” he explained.

Apart from civil aircrafts, the multinational Airbus Group manufactures other equipment such as helicopters and satellites that can be used to monitor fishing activities off shore, as well as inland poaching and medical evacuation.

“We believe that we can support and partner with Namibia to develop services that will generate revenue and not generate an additional debt,” he said.

In response, President Geingob said the public enterprise concept is a good idea, as long as it does not require Government to spend money. He said Namibia’s marine patrol is not in a bad state as is inland poaching.

“The idea of a win-win situation where we can earn revenue and you recoup from the services sounds good, but I cannot give you the go-ahead now without consulting the relevant ministries,” he said.

Also present at the meeting was Minister of Public Enterprises, Leon Jooste, who said the concept is an innovative approach to an old problem.

“When we look at a new enterprise, we would always want to evaluate how we can de-risk that for us, obviously from a financial perspective. We have a dramatically fluctuating currency. Those are all items we would like look into very deeply,” he said. – Nampa

April 2017
M T W T F S S
« Mar   May »
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930