Alternative housing systems needed for Africa’s renewal

May 29, 2017
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By Thandisizwe Mgudlwa

Cape Town – African countries facing huge challenges in providing proper human settlements to their citizens should seriously consider the Moladi system.

Moladi, a multi-award winning construction system that was developed in South Africa in 1986, makes housing accessible to low-income groups through innovative and eco-friendly technology.

Its success in over 20 countries shows that affordable housing is an important key in finding solutions to promote security and alleviating poverty.

Decent housing is one of the key factors in the fight against poverty and social exclusion. It is not just about putting a roof over someone’s head – development experts have attested.

Academic research proves that access to a clean and stable home implicates an improvement in security, health and education.

Moladi, a South African based company established in 1986, makes housing accessible to low-income people through innovative and eco-friendly technology.

The Moladi system consists of a reusable and recyclable plastic formwork mould, which is filled with stone-less concrete and a special chemical additive. This additive ensures that, once the mortar is set, the formwork can be removed – and reused up to 50 times.

According to the founder Hennie Botes, the brickless walls can withstand all types of weather. The formwork is lightweight allowing easy transportation. Due to the simplicity in design and the repetitive application scheme, construction costs can be reduced significantly. The Moladi model is not only cost-effective but fast too.

Botes further commented that the wall structure of a house can be completed within one day.

A further plus point, especially in remote areas, is that the construction does not require heavy machinery or electricity.

With the motto “Train the unemployed to build for the homeless” Moladi combines construction with economic development.

The company also offers training locally for the unemployed thereby creating jobs and empowering the community as a whole.

Due to the simplicity of the approach, construction techniques and skills can be transferred in a short time. In this way, the communities benefit from affordable shelter and skilled entrepreneurs (in the area of low-cost housing) at the same time.

Recently, Hennie Botes, CEO and designer of moladi, discussed the role moladi can perform to help solve the huge backlog of affordable homes in India with Minister of Housing Dr. Girija Vyas.

Negotiations have been initiated to set up a new entity “moladiINDIA” to represent the technology exclusive in India. – Creating skills and employment through technology transfer.  “Train the unemployed to build for the homeless.”

Botes was invited to present the solution at the 13th NATCON-2013 in Moscow, hosted by the Confederation of Real Estate Developers Associations of India (CREDAI), the apex body representing private real estate developers in India.

The World Bank estimates that India’s urban population will hit 600 million by 2031 – more than double that in 2001.

Housing shortages in India are also acute: the 2012 urban housing backlog was estimated at 19 million and valued at approximately $200 billion, indicating that one fourth of the urban dwellers are living in inadequate housing or are homeless (total population 1.2 billion).

Decent housing is one of the key factors in the fight against poverty and social exclusion.

It is not just about putting a roof over someone’s head – development experts attest.

Academic research proves that access to a clean and stable home implicates an improvement in security, health and education.

The moladi system consists of a reusable and recyclable plastic formwork mould, which is filled with stone-less concrete and a special chemical additive. This additive ensures that, once the mortar is set, the formwork can be removed – and reused up to 50 times.

According to Botes, the brick-less walls can withstand all types of weather. The formwork is lightweight allowing easy transportation. Due to the simplicity in design and the repetitive application scheme, construction costs can be reduced significantly.

The Moladi model is not only cost-effective but fast too.

Botes further comments that the wall structure of a house can be completed within one day. A further plus point, especially in remote areas, is that the construction does not require heavy machinery or electricity.

With the motto “Train the unemployed to build for the homeless” Moladi combines construction with economic development.

The company also offers training locally for the unemployed thereby creating jobs and empowering the community as a whole.

Due to the simplicity of the approach, construction techniques and skills can be transferred in a short time. In this way, the communities benefit from affordable shelter and skilled entrepreneurs (in the area of low-cost housing) at the same time.

Meanwhile, the African Union for Housing Finance, which is promoting housing finance on the African continent, is a member-based association of mortgage banks, building societies, housing corporations and other organisations involved in the mobilisation of funds for shelter and housing on the African continent.

The AUHF also commissions research, currently in collaboration with the Centre for Affordable Housing Finance in Africa.

According to the Leilani Farha, United Nations’ special rapporteur on the right to housing, financial speculation has led to an “unsustainable” global housing crisis.

In Farha latest report on global housing need, she reveals that the world’s money markets have priced people out of cities, with speculators treating housing as a “place to park capital”.

Farha remarks, “Housing has lost its social function and is seen instead as a vehicle for wealth and asset growth. It has become a financial commodity, robbed of its connection to community, dignity and the idea of home.” • Source: archdaily.com

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