SUPERCHARGE YOUR LIFE

 

Leverage – Achieving Much More with the Same Effort

To lift a heavy object, you have a choice: use leverage or not. You can try to lift the object directly – risking injury – or you can use a lever, such as a jack or a long plank of wood, to transfer some of the weight, and then lift the object that way.

Which approach is wiser? Will you succeed without using leverage? Maybe. But you can lift so much more with leverage, and do it so much more easily!

So what has this got to do with your life and career? The answer is “a lot”. By applying the concept of leverage to business and career success, you can, with a little thought, accomplish very much more than you can without it. Without leverage, you may work very hard, but your rewards are limited by the hours you put in. With leverage, you can break this connection and, in time, achieve very much more.

Levers of Success

To do this, you’ll need to learn how to use the leverage of:-

• Time (yours and that of other people).

• Resources.

• Knowledge and education.

• Technology.

Time Leverage

Using the leverage of time is the most fundamental strategy for success. There are only so many hours in a day that you can work. If you use only your own time, you can achieve only so much. If you leverage other people’s time, you can increase productivity to an extraordinary extent.

To leverage YOUR OWN time.

Practice effective time management.  Eliminate unnecessary activities, and focus your effort on the things that really matter.

• As part of this, learn how to prioritize so that you focus your energy on the activities that give the greatest return for the time invested.

• Use goal setting to think about what matters to you in the long term, set clear targets, and motivate yourself to achieve those targets.

To leverage other people’s time.

• Learn how to delegate work to other people.

• Train and empower others 

• Bring in experts and consultants to cover skill or knowledge gaps.

• Outsource non-core tasks to people with the experience to do them more efficiently.

Providing that you do things properly, the time and money that you invest in leveraging other people’s time is usually well spent. Remember, though, that you’ll almost always have to “pay” up front in some way in order to reap the longer-term benefits of using leverage.

Resource Leverage

You can also exert leverage by getting the most from your assets, and taking full advantage of your personal strengths.

You have a wide range of skills, talents, experiences, thoughts, and ideas. These can, and should, be used in the best combination. What relevant skills and strengths do you have that others don’t? How can you use these to best effect, and how can you improve them so that they’re truly remarkable? What relevant assets do you have that others don’t? Can you use these to create leverage? Do you have connections that others don’t have? Or financial resources? Or some other asset that you can use to greater effect?

A good way of thinking about this is to conduct a personal SWOT (Strength, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats) analysis, focusing on identifying strengths and assets, and expanding from these to identify the opportunities they give you. 

Knowledge and Education Leverage

Another significant lever of success is applied knowledge. Combined with education and action, this can generate tremendous leverage.

Learning by experience is slow and painful. If you can find more formal ways of learning, you’ll progress much more quickly and avoid high-risk gaps. This is why people working in life-or-death areas (such as architects, airline pilots, medical doctors and suchlike) need long and thorough training. After all, would you want to be operated on by an unqualified surgeon?

While few of us operate in quite such immediately critical areas, by determining what you need to know, and then acquiring that knowledge, you can avoid many years of slow, painful trial and error learning.

The keys to successfully leveraging knowledge and education are: firstly, knowing what you need to learn; secondly knowing to what level you need to learn it; thirdly, being very focused and selective in your choices; and fourthly, in taking the time to earn the qualifications you need.

Even then, having more education or more knowledge isn’t necessarily a point of leverage. These become advantages only when they can be directly applied to your career goals and aspirations–and when they’re used actively and intelligently to do something useful.

Technology Leverage

Finding technology leverage is all about thinking about how you work, and using technology to automate as much of this as you can.

At a simple level, you might find that all you need to keep you in touch with home and work is a laptop computer. Smartphones are handy tools for making the best of your downtime during working hours or while traveling. If you’re a slow typist, voice recognition software can help you dictate documents and save time.

At a more sophisticated level, you may find that you can use simple desktop databases like Microsoft Access to automate simple work processes. If you do a lot of routine data processing (for example, if you run many similar projects) you can find that this saves you a great deal of time. 

Businesses can choose from a wide array of software solutions. 

Apply This to Your Life

Complete a personal SWOT analysis. This will help give you a real sense of what you’re good at and what activities might benefit from some outside help. From there, you can start to build a leveraging strategy to maximize your productivity and performance.

Look for a mentor who understands and uses leverage, and learn from his or her experiences. – Source: www.mindtools.com

This is an example of using leverage to learn more about leveraging – so that exponential factor kicks in again.

Increase your personal expectations. Take a look at your current goals, and ask yourself how much further you could push those goals by using leverage on a consistent basis. You may far surpass your pre-leverage goals once you commit to “working smart.”

Surround yourself with a network of great people who have skills, knowledge, and expertise that you don’t possess. Look for opportunities to create synergy, and leverage the talents of everyone involved. When you work together, you can accomplish so much more than going it alone.

Source: www.mindtools.com

March 2015
M T W T F S S
« Feb   Apr »
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031